Wedding Feature – December 7, 2018

The DOs and DON’Ts of Restaurant Proposals

Marriage proposals inside restaurants are popular ways to pop the question. Many couples find proposing over a candlelit meal is a romantic way to get engaged, providing a perfect setting to begin a life together.

Even though restaurant proposals have been popularized by television sitcoms and movies on the big screen, those taking this route should do some homework before sitting down to eat. As with all components of wedding planning, it’s essential to get the proposal right to create lasting, positive memories.

  • DO choose a place with the right ambience. If you do not have a favorite restaurant in mind, go online and do some research for picturesque or romantic establishments. Many online reviews now include images, which can help you find the right setting.
  • DO make a reservation. An engagement should not be left to chance. Call ahead and speak with a manager and mention that you will be orchestrating a proposal. Find out if the restaurant will help you make it extra special. Some may decorate your table with favorite flowers or provide a specific champagne once the proposal has been accepted.
  • DON’T propose at the beginning of the meal. Set the scene with conversation and start to enjoy as much of the food as possible. Take time to enjoy the service, food and beverages. Some appetizers and a little wine in your stomach can ease pre-proposal jitters as well.
  • DON’T forget the ring. The ring is its own spectacle, but there are ways to present it in an even more glorious light. Plan ahead so that the ring is tied to an exquisite tea cup brought out during dessert service. Or, if you’re worried about putting the ring in the hands of others, bring along a hand-painted plate that asks “Will You Marry Me?” The wait staff can cover the question with the entreé or a dessert. As your partner eats, the message will become clear.
  • DO expect a scene. Proposing marriage in a restaurant is bound to cause a big reaction – tears included. If you’re not comfortable with public displays, you may want to reconsider popping the question in such a public setting.
  • DO consider a weeknight. Restaurants are less busy on weeknights than weekends, so you can expect a more intimate setting Monday through Thursday than you might find Friday through Sunday. Restaurant proposals are traditional, and there are various ways to make them just right.

 

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